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10 Ways Advanced Computing Catalyzes Science

By ­.S. National Science Foundation

November 23, 2015

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Numerous academic research projects around the U.S. and beyond rely on high-performance computing (HPC) resources funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF).

The iPlant Collaborative has developed a cyberinfrastructure for life science research that is providing insights into the genetic traits of crops, while the nanoHUB portal is doing similar work in the space of nanomaterials. The NSF-funded Blue Waters supercomputer located at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications is being used by a variety of academic research programs, including the Southern California Earthquake Center and a joint NSF-National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency project to develop high-resolution Digital Elevation Models of the Arctic.

Wake Forest University's Center for Injury Biomechanics is using the Blacklight supercomputer at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center to simulate the effects of car crashes on human bodies. Advanced LIGO, an ambitious project to revamp the way that astronomical data is captured and shared among researchers, is utilizing the assets of XSEDE, an NSF collection of HPC resources and services.

The Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) is using NSF funding to pursue a number of projects, including educational initiatives aimed at training the next generation of HPC professionals, and a project to build up the supercomputing community in South Africa, Tanzania, and Botswana in part by relocating a decommissioned TACC supercomputer.

From U.S. National Science Foundation
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